HP is once again pursuing superlatives. The business introduced the Spectre Folio last year–the first leather computer. It also trotted out this year's first 15-inch computer with an AMOLED screen at CES, battling rival Dell as the first to offer a 240hz display gaming phone. It continues its task to gather with the fresh Elite Dragonfly a lot of "firsts." You would be thanked with that title for believing it's the recent Avenger, but no. HP claims to be the "lightest 13-inch company convertible in the world." That's correct, with a lot of caveats attached, it's the lightest laptop!

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The Elite Dragonfly, apart from skepticism, weighs in at an impressive sub-1 kg mark, and we  definitely discovered it interesting. It feels as light as the Galaxy Book S, though its shiny texture made Samsung's laptop feel more costly.

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The Elite Dragonfly, however, packs up to 2 TB of storage and 16 GB of RAM far more strong arms than the Galaxy Book S, including an eighth-generation Intel Core vPro processor. After all, it is a company laptop and is not intended to compete with the Samsung model, which is more suitable for customers who want a travel-friendly notebook.

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It's all the more remarkable that, considering all the features it provides, the Dragonfly is so gentle. HP offers a battery life of up to 16.5 hours, although the firm also offers a mildly stronger longer-lasting model (up to 24.5 hours).

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Depending on the sort of screen you choose, your runtime is probable to differ. There is a complete HD low-power panel running at 400 nits, a HDR400 UHD screen that grows as loud as 550 nits, and a complete HD display variant with built-in HP's Sure View privacy shield. That last one runs up to a thousand nits.

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Whichever of these you choose, bezels as thin as 4.75 mm are flanked on the sides, while the top bezel is 10.25 mm. That, if you care about those figures, provides it a screen-to-body percentage of 86 percent.

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A Windows Hello-capable webcam is hidden in the top bezel, which is something that even the Dell XPS 15 (2019) does not give. Although they don't have likewise small bezels, most other PCs do as well. I like the Dragonfly's built-in mechanical shutter so you can slip it for privacy over the webcam.

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It's also good to see this slim device with a wide range of ports. With Thunderbolt 3, a full-size HDMI, one USB-A and a headphone jack, the Dragonfly tries to fit in two USB C while keeping a 0.63-inch profile

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But for a little bit back to this one-kilogram amount. HP has been able to decrease the weight of the laptop so much because instead of the stronger aluminum it utilizes a magnesium case.

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In addition to embracing a heavier keyboard and keyboard image than the one on the EliteBook x360 1030 G3, the firm trimmed grams wherever it could, but also changing something that seems as inconsistent (weight-wise) as the trackpad.

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But that's not all it's done with the keys— HP used rubber domes that they claim are twice as quiet as the 1030 G3. In the noisy demo area, I couldn't compare the decibel difference, but the new keys don't seem to harm the writing experience a lot.

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If you or your colleagues are annoyed by noisy typing on your conferences, you will also enjoy the noise-canceling function of HP, which is specifically intended during conference calls to decrease keyboard noise. Again, during my hands-on, this wasn't something we could check, but it should be fairly helpful in practice.

The superlative game (attached to very specific qualifiers) is not yet finished with HP. According to the company, Elite Dragonfly also holds the following titles:

  • "World's first business convertible with 4X4 LTE antennas"
  • "World's highest screen to body ratio in a 13-inch business convertible"
  • "World's longest battery life in a 13-inch business convertible"
  • "World's first business convertible with pre-installed personal well being software"

That last headline, despite causing a lot of "bloatware!" alarms, stands out to me. As someone who has tried to accomplish a stronger work-life equilibrium and is paying attention to her mental health, we were happy to learn about the private wellness technology of HP.  

It is system-level programming that offers custom suggestions to take breaks or get up and move around. HP hasn't communicated too many specifics beyond that, so it's difficult to say how helpful this is going to be, but I'm happy the business is at least making a display of caring about the well-being of its clients.

The Elite Dragonfly will be accessible from $1,549 on October 25th, which seems costly for an organisation to order for its staff. But it offers a lot for the cash and is perhaps the most beautiful company notebook we've ever seen.

Even if you may not be prepared to purchase this for yourself right now, some of the fresh features and design aspects (like the lighter body) are probable to flow out to HP's consumer products quickly.